CBA bank deftly uses Twitter for issues management

Switched-on business practice, or setter of dangerous precedent? This story explores how one Aussie bank (Commonwealth) spotted an exasperated customer complaint on Twitter then rectified the problem in under two hours. Though as a client said in Sydney yesterday – and I paraphrase – “…what about all the other poor buggers with customer service gripes who’ve been waiting weeks or months for resolution?”

PS: Consider this an unofficial Tweet from me: it’s pelting down on the Gold Coast and I’m being strongly discouraged from getting into the outdoor pool for a swim. Like you lot care!!

 

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2 Responses to CBA bank deftly uses Twitter for issues management

  1. Erik says:

    Hi Gerry, I would like to start off by saying I like your blog!

    Certainly interesting to see the power of twitter evolve and it seems like the Commonwealth Bank handled this instance nicely. However, (as you point out) if you read the other comments beneath it seems like they have other customers to worry about as well. Maybe we all should use Twitter to effectively communicate with CBA? Because I can imagine if the person (who twitted) in question tried say the same thing directly to customer service it wouldn’t go so well. But as soon as it is out there in the social media sphere, all of a sudden it is a problem that requires attention. Ironic.

    Well, good luck to the CBA. Let’s see if they learn from this or if they’ll merely be gloating over the fact that they managed to save face by realizing social media exists. Hmm, anyone for the latter?

    Anyway, it is apparent that they have other customers and publics to worry about as well.

  2. Gerry says:

    Thanks Erik; re your point about us all Twittering CBA; whispers say CBA didnt actually have a formal twitter monitoring program (monitter or tweetdeck for eg), but that it was a sole staffer who picked up the customer grips. That aside, you’re spot-on that it wasnicely handled/managed in a way that def enhanced the bank’s image. Gerry

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